Definition

One must make a distinction however: when dragged into prominence by half poets, the result is not poetry, nor till the autocrats among us can be “literalists of the imagination”—above insolence and triviality and can present for inspection, imaginary gardens with real toads in them, shall we have it.

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Kerry's Wednesday Challenge

THE STORY

Breakfast at Tiffany's is a novella by Truman Capote published in 1958. The novella tells the story of a one-year (autumn 1943 to autumn 1944) friendship between Holly Golightly, and an unnamed narrator. The two are both tenants in a brownstone apartment in Manhattan's Upper East Side. Holly Golightly (age 18-19) is a country girl turned New York café society girl, who entertains all the rich men she can find, hoping to snag one in marriage. Despite popular misconception, Capote explicitly denies that Holly is a call girl. Holly, who likes to stun people with her outspoken viewpoints on various topics, slowly reveals herself to the narrator who finds himself fascinated by her curious lifestyle. In the end Holly fears that she will never know what is really hers until after she has thrown it away.

THE CHALLENGE
Visit the Goodreads quote page and choose an excerpt from the novella to inspire your own ideas.  Write a poem in any form or style, in which you explore the thoughts which arise.  Share the quote as a preface to your poem.  There is no time limit to this challenge. 
Please leave a comment after you have linked up your poem.

5 comments:

Sherry Blue Sky said...

Good one, Kerry. I'll try this one.

Kerry O'Connor said...

It's been one of those weeks.

Robert Lloyd said...

Oh you so dare to tempt me with Audrey? I will be back hopefully today with a response. She is my favorite afterall. I used to have a blue healer named Audrey and I still on a cat named Bogart. I love the silver screen. A side note. Did you know that in the movie the guy was straight but in the book it is assumed by many that he is gay? I have not read it myself but its what I have been told.

Kerry O'Connor said...

I always thought him semi-autobiographical for Capote himself, so it would make sense... and I recall a reference to Hepburn some where along the line, Robb :)

Philip Thrift said...

"Shock department top bananas"
(not very Audrey)