Definition

One must make a distinction however: when dragged into prominence by half poets, the result is not poetry, nor till the autocrats among us can be “literalists of the imagination”—above insolence and triviality and can present for inspection, imaginary gardens with real toads in them, shall we have it.

Monday, August 18, 2014

Open Link Monday with Magaly

Welcome to the Garden, Word Lovers…

I’m in an extra-sharing mood, today. So let me share a bit about me.

 The Haunting, by SunshineShelle
via

My poetry writing journey didn’t start very long ago. Go ahead; this is the time when you say things like, “Really? Wow! But you are so good.” I’ll wait… Okay, you’re so kind. *giggles*

I wrote my first poem in 2010. It wasn’t very good. The second one wasn’t much better. “Sexy, Dark and Bloody”, my third, felt different. Perhaps because its words were birthed out of hot frustration, rage and an intense desire not to punch a certain someone in the mouth.

You see, I had just submitted a short story for a fiction contest. The story won first place, but one of five judges said that “letting [me] win” the contest had been a mistake. He said this to my face, while waving a copy of my work in front of others. He was a poet. And he got very upset because I chose to paraphrase a quote from a poem he held very close to his heart. According to him, I insulted the author of the original work. Mind you, the main motif of my story had to do with the way in which time and experience can change the meaning of a word for an individual.

I wrote “Sexy, Dark and Bloody” the afternoon before the award ceremony. As the first place winner, I was given the choice to read an excerpt from my story or from any short work that fitted the allotted time. I drafted the poem a couple of hours before the reading. I was terrified because my poetry experience was nonexistent. But I was full of passion. I finished reading for the 40 or so people sitting in front of me—literature professors and students and their guests—and no one made a sound. The rib-crushing silence lasted about 30 seconds. Then someone stood up and began to applaud. Soon after that the room was as thunderous as the inside of my chest.   

I read my poem facing the poet who said I had no respect for someone else’s work, and that I shouldn’t waste my time writing about “things that weren’t real and that weren’t [mine].”

When this happened, I had no idea why I chose poetry instead of fiction to make my point. Or why the opinion of someone I didn’t particularly care about affected me so deeply. Today, I understand: I needed personal words; lines that left the lips raw and the heart sore; stanzas that told this man that I would not allow anyone—especially not a stranger—to limit my voice or the way in which I used my words. I love short fiction. Storytelling will always be my first and forever love, but in my soul poetry serves a purpose that can’t be replaced by other forms. I’m not quite sure how to explain exactly what I mean by this; not yet… maybe in another year or three.


Open Link Monday is for sharing a poetic work of your choosing, regardless of theme or format. Have fun and be free; that’s what we are here for, isn’t it? And if you have a poem that you wrote while bursting with hot emotions, I would love to read it. 

Do visit other word lovers. Read their words and leave words in kind, for “Silence is not a natural environment for stories [or for poetry]. They need words. Without them they grow pale, sicken and die. And then they haunt you.” ~ The Thirteenth Tale, by Diane Setterfield.

21 comments:

Björn Rudberg said...

I think the main lesson is that poetry feeds of passion.. let it be anger, love, frustration... myself I write best when I'm angry...

Today I share a little ditty I did last evening playing with rhymes :-)

No passion -- just playing around

patteran said...

Some reflections on language - who owns it, how it grows...

Arushi Ahuja said...

Such a passionate way to start... amazing sharing magalay... to hell with that judge... you're amazing. ..

blueoran said...

I wrote my first poem in 1971. Horrible. Every poem I write is a failure, but it's somehow akin to what Rilke described as wrestling and being defeated by successively greater angels. The stinging criticism you got from the poet will stay in your ears, I think. A challenge to show good reason for writing another poem. You have decades to unearth the mystery of poetry, put them to good use!

Marian said...

Well, Magaly... I'm just going to speak for everyone and say we want to read "Sexy, Dark, and Bloody."

Good morning, Toads! I believe Kerry probably knows she has created a little triquain monster over here. Thank you, Sister-Poet. xoxo

Kerry O'Connor said...

Your story is an object lesson for all of us, I think Magaly. Criticism without positive reinforcement can wear down the (all-reading sensitive) poetic soul. Thank you for sharing.

I'm glad we have at least one little triquain monster around, Marian, especially since I thought I might try another one today myself.

Happy Monday everyone.

Magaly Guerrero said...

Kerry, I believe there will be many little monsters joining your Triquain Tribe. I have never really care for form poetry, but I'm pretty sure I'm falling for this one. ;-D

Thanks for your words, everyone. I will digest each of them and let them feed my muse.

And for those who asked, I've linked "Sexy, Dark and Bloody" as my entry for today. ♥

bridge2vision said...

Happy Monday to the writer's putting it out there this morning. I am new to poetry in 2014, and have learned so much reading the work of other poets. It's a valuable space here that facilitates learning and sharing. I look forward to reading my way around your links this morning.

Susan said...

Wonderful courageous story, Magaly! I get scared when the gods AND goddesses (devils?) in me surprise me by taking charge. I've been taming my anger, but every now and then, especially when it's constructive and rebellious, God whispers in my ear "I don't care what you name it, it is I." Heehee.

Jim said...

I am glad you continued, Magaly, you write very well. I also looked up what I first posted on my poem blog and this was it. There were probably a few more that were on the other blog or that weren't very easy to find.
One Single Impression has ceased. A few of us have migrated over to the Toads. Thank you, Toads.
..

Helen said...

One word ~ passion.

Karen S. said...

I trust in your true soul,(you've often unleashed for us) in which I have read many depths far beyond what any un-hearing judge could truly capture. Be not ever judged by fools! Your words have always inspired me. Exactly why I had to post here today!

Susie Clevenger said...

Passion...that is what poetry is about. I haven't won a thing for my poetry. I'm a penny poet in million dollar talent, but I keep writing! Thanks for sharing this!

Magaly Guerrero said...

I suspect that one day, I will be write a post very similar to this one to explain how Passion and Poetry were birthed out of the same womb. At least, it feels that way to me. ;-)

Now I'm off to read all the yumminess everyone has shared today!

Timoteo said...

Love ya, Toads!

Jazzbumpa said...

Magaly -

Congrats on winning that contest.

I hope your rude critic was suitably chastened.

Cheers!
JzB

Kathryn Dyche Dechairo said...

I often find that I am able to say things through the words of a poem that I am unable to say otherwise. Bravo to you for being able to take them from the page to voicing them out loud. Kudos.

Roan said...

Great quote from the Thirteenth Tale. Enjoyed reading your post. I'm not a poet and I must say I don't understand most of it, but my grandmother wrote poetry and now my granddaughter. So I read it and admire those who can call forth the words and arrange them into a poem. I think you made your point!

Ella said...

Thank you Magaly, for sharing this~ We need to be reminded that our souls have a voice. We can be haunted if we do not express ourselves-thank you!!!

Magaly Guerrero said...

I'm grinning right now. I just love taking part in the sharing of words that bring us a bit closer together... ♥

Hannah said...

Thank you for sharing your story, Magaly. It's important to stand up the way you did. ♥